A History Of West Indies Cricket

A History Of West Indies Cricket offers West Indian fans and all cricket enthusiast the complete story of West Indies in Test and International cricket.

This comprehensive book runs from the first tour of England in 1906 and the official Test matches in 1928, to the first test series won abroad in 1950, and through to 2000, by which time the West Indies had completed a double ‘blackwash’ of England and proved them selves the most powerful all-round side in the world at that time.

At the same time the author Michael Manley who serve as Prime Minister of Jamaica from 1972-1980, recalls his own enthusiasm for the game, kindleed at the age of ten when he watched George Headley make 270 not out against the English tourist in 1934-5, and the devastating fast bowling of Martindale and Constantine.

As a student in London he saw, first hand the victorious team of 1950 and nearly thirty years later as Prime Minister of Jamaica, he played a pivotal behind the scenes role in the ‘Packer Affair’.

What ever view one holds of World Series cricket, in Mr. Manley’s opinion it was instrucmental in honing the West Indian cricketers into the finest professional team of the period 1979-1995.

In A History of West Indies cricket, Michael Manley proves himself a perceptive writer on the West Indies game. He makes revealing comparisons between cricket and baseball; like C.L.R James he understands crickets place in West Indian culture; as a distinguish politician he knows how cricket, as Clive Lloyd puts it in his introduction is the instrucment of Caribbean cohesion.

He glories in the character of the great West Indian players: Learie Constantine, a league cricketer who also played in Test but with his immitable panache; George Headley, who carried the West Indies on his shoulders through the 1930′s.

Frank Worrell, the first black captain, who was so long denied by the system; Garfield Sobers, the greatest all-round player the game has produce, Clive Lloyd the mild manner giant who welded his team, together despite early failure into the sharpest instrucment in the game.

The book has been fully updated, telling the recent story of West Indian cricket in the nineties and at the start of the 21st century. The records sections have also been brought up to date.The portraits of these men and the other fine players an personalities of the last 76 years, are presented with understanding and authority.

The update version of A History of West Indies cricket, highlights the sad demise of West Indian cricket. It shows how the accessibility of cable television from the United States has shown youngsters in the Caribbean other sports.

Ones which offer untold wealth to even those of moderate professional standard. Football too has taken a hold, with Jamaica reaching the World Cup finals in 1998.

In the updated version, The year 2000 was seen as a watershed as it saw the Test careers of both Walsh and Ambrose close, thus severing the last links with the heyday of West Indian cricket. History has shown it will rise again.

A History Of West Indies Cricket include the scorecards of all the West Indies Test matches, and the Test averages of West Indian cricketers – as well as stimulating comparisons of opening partnerships which shows the pre-emminance of Greenidge and Haynes.

History Of West Indies Cricket is an invaluable work of reference as well as a richly fasinating account of West Indies cricket and cricketers against the political and social background of the West Indian islands.

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